Gratitude Report 2021 – 2022

08.24.2022 | portland, oregon
One Day At Your Zoo

From inspiring education programs to on-the-ground conservation efforts, we are working to create a better future for wildlife and for us all. We can’t do this work without you.

 

Amy Hash and Uni Sushi at the zoo’s sea otter habitat.

Amy Hash and Uni Sushi at the zoo’s sea otter habitat.

 

2,617 people visit the zoo.

2,617 people visit the zoo.

500 people ride the carousel.

500 people ride the carousel.

727 people ride the Zooliner.

727 people ride the Zooliner.

42% are members.

42% are members.

Most come from Oregon and Washington, but visitors also join us from all over N. America and the U.K.

Most come from Oregon and Washington, but visitors also join us from all over N. America and the U.K.

High temperature is 94 degrees, with clear skies.

High temperature is 94 degrees, with clear skies.

800 lbs of nutritious food and 700 lbs of hay are delivered throughout the zoo, feeding over 1,500 animals.

800 lbs of nutritious food and 700 lbs of hay are delivered throughout the zoo, feeding over 1,500 animals.

154 people with lower incomes receive a discount on their admission.

154 people with lower incomes receive a discount on their admission.

 

First-time mom Kitra with Jolene, who was born at the zoo on April 13, 2022.

First-time mom Kitra with Jolene, who was born at the zoo on April 13, 2022.

A day in the life of Bob, Kitra and Jolene.

Primate keepers Asaba Mukobi and Hannah Carbonneau greet the orangutans and begin to prepare the day’s menu: an assortment of apples, watermelon, grapefruit, yams, bell peppers, turnips, eggplant, endive, cabbage, mixed nuts and banana-flavored primate biscuits.

The orangutan family — Bob, Kitra and baby Jolene — moves indoors, enabling care staff to clean the habitat and prepare for the day ahead. Scattering food, especially in the upper areas of the yard, will encourage foraging and tree climbing throughout the day.

Later, as the orangutans return outside, new mom Kitra receives a postnatal vitamin supplement, and Bob gets a banana with food dye. The dye makes it easier to identify fecal samples in the endocrine lab where Bob and Kitra’s hormone levels are regularly tracked. Oregon Zoo Foundation donors have funded equipment and provide ongoing support for the lab, helping improve animal welfare, advancing our knowledge, and providing answers to pressing questions about animal well-being and behavior.
This monitoring allowed care staff to pinpoint the day Kitra became pregnant and prepare for Jolene’s April arrival.

After lunch, the adult orangutans are given the option to participate in training sessions. Keepers work with Bob on a blood-draw behavior, and work to make Kitra comfortable while they interact with her baby. Baby orangutans spend up to eight years with their moms and hang onto them for most of the first year. Asaba and Hannah ask Kitra to present her baby to them so they can work on getting Jolene used to seeing little droppers, in case she ever needs medicine or supplements as she gets older.

After training sessions, the orangutans enjoy searching for a scattering of popcorn. At the end of the day, they forage for more fruits and vegetables and finish their afternoon solving puzzles filled with delicious treats.

Wild orangutans make their beds in different locations every night. With fresh bedding and blankets throughout the habitat, Bob, Kitra and Jolene snuggle in for the evening.]

 

 

Amur Tiger.

Bernadette lines up nicely for training, with one keeper by her tail and another by her head. It can be hard for animals to practice waiting skills, and Bernadette is rewarded after 30 seconds of calm behavior.

Volunteers help monitor the tiger, who on this day is experiencing some health issues (a temporary form of diabetes that has since resolved). Training promotes well-being and reduces stress during medical procedures.

 

Red Panda.

Moshu relaxes after feasting on bamboo provided by the zoo horticulture team. At 11, he is quite old for a red panda and has been slowing down. Ramps in his habitat make it easier for him get around, and monthly cold-laser therapy helps him stay limber.

Caregivers work with Moshu on crate training to make his vet center visits more pleasant.

 

 

Guest Connections.

  • Staff and volunteers log 1,404 interactions with guests, answering questions about animals, wildlife conservation and wayfinding.
  • 90 summer school students explore the zoo.

 

Veterinary Medical Center.

  • Animal-care staff move all waterfowl inside, and prepare to bring the rest of zoo’s birds indoors, as a precaution against avian influenza.
  • Veterinarians take routine radiographs of Asian elephant Samudra’s tusks.
  • Vet techs make “house calls,” joining keepers for training sessions with cheetahs, cougars, black rhinos and chimpanzees. Training promotes well-being and reduces stress during medical procedures.

Northern Leopard Frogs.

Zoo staff meet with Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife biologists to discuss plans for releasing zoo-reared northern leopard frogs to the wild in the Moses Lake area.

 

 

 

 

Oregon Silverspot Butterfly.

Staff at the zoo’s Butterfly Conservation Lab prepare to receive Oregon silverspots from the coast, while caring for 246 eggs laid by zoo-bred silverspots.

This happens nowhere else in the galaxy that we know of!
They also monitor silverspots that have moved into diapause — which is like hibernation for insects — keeping them safe in a temperature range that mimics conditions at the coast.

On the sun porch behind the lab, staff tend to early blue violet plants, the main food source for silverspot caterpillars as they mature into adult butterflies.

 

 

 

Humbolt Penguins.

Humboldt penguins complete their “catastrophic molt” — which isn’t as bad as it sounds! While most seabirds replace their feathers gradually, penguins shed them all at once. The process takes three to four weeks, and on this day the last penguin in the colony to complete the molt has donned a fresh new “tux.”

 

California Condor.

A dozen California condor chicks splash in pools and sunbathe with their parents at the Jonsson Center for Wildlife Conservation. Care staff monitor their health and observe their antics via remote cameras.

The 12-chick cohort is the biggest yet in the zoo’s 19-year effort to save this species from extinction. With just around 500 California condors left in the world, each new arrival is vitally important.

California condor recovery efforts take place at the Jonsson Center for Wildlife Conservation, located in rural Clackamas County, Oregon. The remoteness of the facility minimizes the exposure of young condors to people, increasing the chances for them to survive and breed in the wild.

 

First-time mom Kitra with Jolene, who was born at the zoo on April 13, 2022.